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going to happen. health complications. >> fred, thanks so much from cairo. and now on to afghanistan where for the second time in less than a week, an assassination has claimed the life of a senior afghan official. barbara starr joins us now from washington. the key ally was assassinated in his home west of kabul today. this man is the former of the province and a key ally of the karzai government. now, as you say, this is the second one in just a few days. of course, earlier the half-brother was assassinated in kandahar, southern afghanistan. all of this comes, of course, as we are seeing the first u.s. troops begin to come home from the war zone. we are seeing the beginning of the turnover to afghan security control in afghanistan and tomorrow general david petraeus scheduled to give up his command to the next general coming in from the united states to command the war. things are moving very rapidly in afghanistan but the security situation certainly remains very tenuous. fred? >> barbara starr in washington, thanks so much. let's go to kabul where we find david. what are you lear
the crucial southern provinces of afghanistan for karzai. his death has been described as a huge setback for karzai and for the international coalition that is trying to support the karzai government in kabul. let's try to understand why he was such a crucial figure. it provides a window into understanding the future of afghanistan. ahmed walid karzai was ruthless with tribes that would not support his brother, cutting them off from any aid and military assistance. in addition, he gave the american and british forces in afghanistan information on hostile tribes, provided crucial intelligence on key groups and militants. he was also the first afghan leader to begin talking with the taliban about cease-fires and their entry into government. in other words, he was a practical deal maker. now, he was famous in the west or notorious for the corruption that surrounded him. but corruption surrounded all of the billions of dollars in american and western military aid and spending being brought into afghanistan. everyone in afghanistan was corrupt. ahmed karzai was an ally and an effective deal m
into understanding the future of afghanistan. amid wally carsi karzai was rut with troops not supporting his brother, cutting them off from any aid. he gave the american and brid tisch forces information on hostile tribes, provided crucial intelligence on key groups and militants. he was the first afghan leader to begin talking with the taliban about ceasefires and their entry in the government. in other words, he was a practical deal maker. now, he was famous in the west or notorious for the corruption that surrounded him. but corruption surrounded all of the billions of dollars in american and western military aid and spending being brought into afghanistan. everyone in afghanistan was corrupt. amid karzai was an ally and effective deal maker. a journalist recalls he was a wheeler dealer in the classic afghan mode. but if tefs a rogue, he was a loveable rogue who charmed you, one way of doing political business in afghanistan. karzai's death reminds us it is the kind of political business he excelled at that we need urgently. that is what will ultimately bring stability to afghanistan, whether the
. >>> this was the last day in afghanistan for america's best-known general, david petraeus, who transferred command of u.s. and nato led troops to his replacement, general john allen. a west point graduate with a princeton phd, easily the most celebrated modern day general officer is leaving to run the cia as the u.s. prepares for a gradual drawdown from afghanistan. >>> when we come back here tonight, new research on head injuries and dementia and alzheimer's and a group that the researchers are most concerned about tonight. >>>, and later, they may have come up short in the end, but the u.s. women's world cup team members are still american idols. >>> we're back, as promised, with news that may help solve a mystery. researchers set out to see what happened later in life to those americans who served in vietnam. what they found, presented today at the annual meeting of the alzheimer's association, is that head injuries during that war may be linked to dementia years later. and the findings could mean a frightening scenario, of course, for veterans of our current dual wars. thousands of them have come h
's effort to cut $1 billion in annual costs to the company. >>> this was the last day in afghanistan for america's best-known general, david petraeus, who transferred command of u.s. and nato-led troops in that country today to his replacement, general john allen. a west point graduate with a princeton phd, easily the most celebrated modern day general officer is leaving to run the cia as the u.s. prepares for a gradual drawdown from afghanistan. >>> when we come back here tonight, new research is on head injuries, dementia and alzheimer's, and the group that researchers are most concerned about tonight. >>> they may have come up short in the end, but u.s. team is still american idols. end, but u.s. team is still "american idol"s. your sho. one day i'm on p of the world... the next i'm saying... i have this thing called psoriatic arthritis. i had some intense pain. it progressively got worse. my rheumatologist told me about enbrel. i'm surprised how quickly my symptoms have been managed. [ male announcer ] because enbrel suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fig
last act as commander of nato forces in afghanistan. he handed off authority to the new komd ander john allen. petraeus is retiring from the army at the end of the month. he will be taking over as director of the cia in september. >> that's right. the government not able to pay its bills is looming large they are morning. the clock ticks towards the deadline. 16 days now and counting. the president and congressional lead remember pecked to meet again this week. last week wasn't all that successful. at the same time, the senate will begin debating a scaled-back fallback plan. both sides say they are optimistic they will strike a deal. >> i'm confident cooler heads will prevail. at tend we will not allow the united states to default on its debt despite the fact some people think that would be okay. >> if the president keeps insisting on raising taxes on american workers, there's not going to be a deal. i do think, however, that republican leaders will not allow the country to go into default. >> president obama insists both parties must agree on a deal by friday in order for it to get pas
-olds all have a parent who has done multiple tours in iraq or afghanistan. so guess what they like best about the women's team? >> they don't give up. >> reporter: it's their hallmark says espn analyst judy fuady, a member of the 1999 team. >> to show courage and the will to persevere when everything is against you will be their legacy if they can win this game on sunday. >> reporter: but the americans have already achieved one big victory. they're regarded not just as world class women's players, but world class soccer players, period. >> the women are now being appreciated for their skill as athletes. >> reporter: skills they hope will bring home the cup. nbc news, frankfurt. >>> that's "nbc nightly news" for this saturday. i'm lester holt reporting from new york. see you tomorrow morning on "today" and right back here tomorrow evening. "today" and right back here tomorrow evening. good night. captions paid for by nbc-universal television
petteri will be receiving the medal of honor because he had a gun to his head in afghanistan. he was asked to do something for his country, let's ask these people in washington to do something for their country. just get together and get something done. >> you know, there is huge news out of afghanistan this morning that we're going to get to as well as rupert murdoch and his media empire. what's going on with that. >> this is extending, by the way, to "the times" of london? >> yes, the big story. >> the other players, this is earth shattering. i thought the big thing -- i thought it was about one tabloid. whew. this is so serious. >>> ahead this morning, we're going to bring in the ranking member of the budget committee, congressman chris van hollen. and oil tycoon t. boone pickens will be here. eugene robinson. >> by the way, on that story, i mean, they're not tapping the phones of the british prime minister, but they're -- they're trying to get his records -- >> may be an institution that has rot on the the core. it is a big problem. >> medical records. >> bank accounts. >> after the br
. general david petraeus hans over nato command in afghanistan did morning to his replacement, lieutenant general john allen. petraeus leaves the region during a sensitive time. >>> general motors announcing a $300 million investment today, bringing encouraging news to michigan's auto industry. the money could go into a at all-size truck factory in flint. >>> this morning's rush hour should be normal in los angeles. a bridge removal project along the infamous 405 freeway was completed sooner than expected over the weekend. shocking. >> was that much ado about nothing? >> yes. >> really, everyone just kind of went nutty on this whole thing. >> but they did so much media coverage beforehand, i think that's what saved them. >> good preparations. >>> for his final act harry potter turned everything he touched into gold. >> the final movie in the franchise took in a record $168 million in the u.s. this weekend. here's t.j. winick with the story. >> you're a wizard, harry. >> reporter: ten years. eight films. $6 million in ticket sales. harrrr potter has cast a spell over an entire generation.
moment of unity. the army's 170th infantribury good day in afghanistan held its breath on every kick. while around the world, this was the cheer. >> usa! usa! >> usa! >> reporter: in new york's times square. >> they've got the guys rocking the women's jerseys. it feels really good. >> reporter: suburban los angeles. >> i look up to every single one of them. >> reporter: and a sports bar where expats and tourists stood for the national anthem. in the twitter verse, thousands of fans tweeted support including justin timberlake. lans armstrong and president obama who watched the game with his family. while in frankfurt dr. jill biden and chelsea clinton represented the white house. a former soccer mom herself. >> you must be so excited! >> reporter: biden thanked the parents of the team. >> it's the moms and the dads who are behind their children and who get them to where they are today. >> reporter: it was not the ending america hoped for. but for some, it was still satisfying. >> whoever wins, i'll be happy, to be honest. >> reporter: now, japan won the cup in plenty of hearts here in
-- vietnam, iraq, afghanistan -- is that they are fought mostly by the poor. there are very, very few among the dead and wounded in the those three wars who have been sons or daughters of ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite in the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the air strock rah si to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries, they're there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army, you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland. and so, therefore, officering the army was something that was generally reserved for people in the upper classes. this meant that when these countries went to war in 1914, these upper classes suffered an enormous toll. for examp
in afghanistan. he mosted a video asks mila kunis to go to the marine ball with him. first she said yes and then took it back. mila has a scheduling conflict. she will be filming two movies in november and can't go. but she says she will still hang with him another time. >> do you think that's better or worse, hang with him another time, go to a movie or something like that. you don't think this is happening. you think she is not. why do you think she's not? >> i think that she probably doesn't feel comfortable going on a date with this guy she never met before. and she seemed a little pressured into it by her co-star, justin timberlake. >> now let's see what j.t. says. another marine corps post ad video asking justin timberlake to be her date to the event. she even had a facebook page for it. here is her proposal. >> so, justin, you want to call out my girl mila? i'm going to call you out and ask you to come to the marine corps ball with me in washington, d.c. if you can't go all i have to say is cry me a river. >> that was good. now justin timberlake is in a tough spot. he kept nudgin
currently we have soldiers fighting in afghanistan and people don't seem to forget that. i would not say any prime minister is not fighting for the right people. continues to fight for the right people. >> how would any of those prime ministers ask as editor or chief executive how often or would they ever ask you not to publish a story? would they ask you to spike a story? would that happen? >> i can't remember an occasion of prime minister asked that. >> politicians generally do that? >> no. i can remember many occasions when a cabinet minister or politician or prime minister was very unhappy with stories we were running and -- not that they would ask us not to. >> if they had you would have been interested anyway? >> if the story was true and accurate, no reason for a prime minister -- that is why we have a free press. >> final question. still a feeling that in some way you had a close relationship with the prime minister. the allegation seems to be is no different -- the benefit of what people need to see. you have a close relationship with the prime minister. that was helpful to him and
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)